Contact one of our branches.

HEAD OFFICE 

208-73 N. Cumberland Street

Thunder Bay, Ontario

P7A 4L8

Phone:  (807)286-5341

Fax:  (807)286-5342

Email:  geoff@blueharbourfinancial.com

Open Monday to Friday

By appointment only Saturday and Sunday

ALBERTA

206 Pembina Road

Sherwood Park, Alberta,

T8H 0L8

Phone:  (587)785-9559

Fax:  (807)286-5342

Email:  ryley.hughes@cartewm.com

BRITISH COLUMBIA ​

3172 Golden Link Crescent

Vancouver, British Columbia

V5S 4M3

Phone:  (604)437-3600

Fax:  (778)371-9078

Cell:  (604)782-4334

Email:  wayne.canary@cartewm.com

ONTARIO

Fortax Corp.

2 St. Clair Ave. West, 18th Floor

Toronto, Ontario

M4V 1L5

Phone:  (416)220-6428

Email:  michael.fortin@cartewm.com

Are you paying your “retirement tax”?

As a Canadian consumer, you pay quite a bit in taxes.

If you live in the province of Ontario, for example, in addition to income and other types of taxes, you’re paying 13% in HST on the majority of your purchases.

 

For the most part, we accept paying sales tax as inevitable. Unless there’s a change to the tax rate, we don’t think much about that extra 13% that disappears from our wallets at the till.

 

Here’s a novel idea: what if we had a “tax” that we paid to ourselves?

Let’s call it our Personal Retirenment Tax (PRT).

What if we decided on a certain percentage to automatically put aside for our retirement.

The idea behind this is that there are many costs that we bear without question, simply because “that’s the way it is.” And yet when it comes to retirement, many experts suggest that Canadians aren’t financially prepared. Yet if we were forced to put aside a percentage of our income to finance retirement, we would simply accept that as inevitable.

So why not start paying yourself a 
Personal Retirement Tax?

If your net income is $40,000, for example, and you set your PRT at 13%, that’s $5,200 a year that you’d contribute to your retirement. Over time — say, 20 years — even with modest compound interest or returns on your investment, that could add up to a tidy nest egg of $160,000.*

In order to accumulate that nest egg, you’d only need to save $100 a week. Make it automatic — the same way you would if it were an actual tax being deducted from your pay — by setting up a savings plan to transfer the money each payday from your chequing account into your high-interest savings or your RRSP.

Being a good saver is a state of mind. And making up your mind to pay yourself a PRT could just be the ticket to a leisurely retirement.

 

Let’s create a plan that can help you incorporate your PRT into your plans, I’m here to help you win financially.

Be part of the group of pro-active Canadians that are taking action.

*Based on saving $100 a week and earning 4%, compounded monthly for 20 years, without factoring inflation. Example for illustrative purposes only.

Discover the benefits of Registered Retirement Savings Plans

Here are some questions I can help you answer on our next meeting:

  • Do you need tax deductions?

  • What is your RRSP contribution limit?

  • Do you have any unused RRSP contribution room?

  • Should you apply for a loan?

  • How will you make contributions next year?